Spicer Commission 1991

Appendices

APPENDIX A

The Mandate

 The Citizens' Forum on Canada's Future will involve a dialogue and discussion with and among Canadians. Canadians will have an opportunity to discuss the values and characteristics fundamental to the well-being of Canada.

Specific objectives include:

 (a) ensuring that the views of Canadians from all regions, from all linguistic, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and from all walks of life are obtained on:

(b) ensuring that groups of Canadians from different regions and different walks of life meet and discuss both shared Canadian characteristics and interests, and the identity and concerns of specific regions and groups including:

(c) ensuring that meetings are held among Canadians in each province and territory of Canada and among Canadians from different regions and backgrounds;

(d) ensuring that there is participation by a broad spectrum of Canadians of all ages, origins, regions, and walks of life by:

(e) ensuring that the results and report of the Citizens' Forum on Canada's Future are available to all Canadians.

APPENDIX B

Methodology and Key Issues

Because of the importance and complexity of the input the Citizens' Forum received from Canadians, we had to design a special system of analysis that would allow us to answer questions and reach findings and observations. Computers were essential to this, because of the very large numbers of people and documents involved. But even more essential were the dedicated and committed professional analysts who read every document citizens submitted.

The Forum began receiving letters and briefs almost from the day it was announced. From these early contributions we began developing a list of key words to help us keep track of what issues and concerns and ideas were being offered by whom, and from what part of Canada. This list ultimately had over 2,000 key words, as the process was continuously adapted to capture new ideas and issues raised by Forum participants.

For discussion groups, the Forum provided a kit of materials, including a standardized response form with open-ended questions for a reporter or moderator to answer about the group's comments. Receiving information in this relatively standardized fashion meant that trends could be readily established from a statistically valid sample of 35 per cent of group response forms. This sample was properly weighted to reflect the provincial distribution of population, using standard statistical methods. Following the very, detailed analysis of this sample, all the other group response forms were read by the analysts and checked against the identified trends to confirm common points of view or highlight differences or new trends emerging. Response forms sent in by individuals were analyzed in the same way. Every comment was read, and over 2,000 of the most apt and/or quotable comments were entered into a databank keyed to the major themes identified in this report.

The content and complexity of letters and briefs varied widely. Since there were considerably fewer of them than of group response forms, they were all analyzed and coded in detail. Calls on the toll-free Idea Lines were initially analyzed against a check-list of issues raised by callers, and later analyzed in more detail by means of computerized keyword searches. They also served to cross-check trends of opinion.

The results of this analysis process are presented in Part II of this report - What We Heard. In this appendix, we present a number of graphs which highlight quantitatively some of the major points that emerged from the analysis.

 

MAJOR ISSUES

Figure 1 shows the percentage of contributors who indicated that issues discussed in Section II of this report were among the major issues facing Canada.

* Note:      Total contributions in each category:
		Group Discussion Reports ..........7,211
		Letters & Briefs...................7,056
		1-800 Idea Line Calls.............75,069

POWERS OF FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS

Fig. 2 shows the percentage of group discussion reports which recommended that the powers of the federal government be maintained and strengthened, compared with the percentage which recommended that provincial (or, in some cases territorial) governments should have more powers.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports 
             may have contained more than one type of comment.

QUEBEC AND CANADAIAN UNITY

Fig. 3 shows the positions expressed in group discussion reports on Quebec and Canadian unity, as a percentage of all group discussion reports which commented on the issue.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports 
             may have contained more than one type of comment.

Fig. 4 shows the views expressed, in group discussion reports and letters and briefs, on the impact Quebec separation would have on Quebec and on Canada as a whole. The graph shows positions expressed in documents received from Quebec compared with documents from other provinces and territories. All commenters perceived some impact.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

Fig 5. shows views expressed, through group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line on bilingualism generally and on Canada's official language policy.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND MULTICULTURALISM

Fig 6. shows views expressed, through group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line on cultural diversity in Canadian society and on Canada's multiculturalism policy.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Of the group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line calls which expressed views on Aboriginal land claims, Fig. 7 shows the percentage which favoured or opposed their resolution.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion
             reports may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

Of the group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line calls which expressed views on Aboriginal self government, Fig. 8 shows the percentage which favoured or opposed their resolution.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

THE CANADIAN ECONOMY

Fig. 9 shows the breakdown, by province, or group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and 1-800 idea line calls which identified the economy as an issue of concern.

Of group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and 1-800 idea line calls which identified the economy as an issue of concern, Fig. 10 shows the percentage of each type of contribution which identified the issues listed along the bottom of the chart as areas of specific concern.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP

Fig 11. shows views expressed on Canada's political institutions and leadership through group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

Fig 12. shows views expressed on the Prime Minister's leadership through group discussion reports, letters and briefs, and the 1-800 idea line.


* Note:      Figures don't add to 100 because some group discussion reports
             may have contained more than one type of comment.
             Eg. that separation would have both positive and negative effects.

Last HTML revision: 10 May, 1996

William F. Maton